Search result for

liberal education

(6 entries)
(1.5156 seconds)
ลองค้นหาคำในรูปแบบอื่นๆ เพื่อให้ได้ผลลัพธ์มากขึ้นหรือน้อยลง: -liberal education-, *liberal education*
(เนื่องจากผลลัพธ์จากการค้นหา liberal education มีน้อย ระบบได้ทดลองค้นหาใหม่โดยใส่ดอกจันทน์ (wild-card) ให้โดยอัตโนมัติ: *liberal education*)
English-Thai: NECTEC's Lexitron-2 Dictionary [with local updates]
liberal education    [N] การศึกษาที่ตั้งอยู่บนรากฐานของศิลปศาสตร์

English-Thai: HOPE Dictionary [with local updates]
liberal educationการศึกษาที่ตั้งอยู่บนรากฐานของศิลปศาสตร์หรือliberal arts (ดู)

Chinese-English: CC-CEDICT Dictionary
蔡元培[Cài Yuán péi, ㄘㄞˋ ㄩㄢˊ ㄆㄟˊ, ] Cai Yuanpei (1868-1940), liberal educationalist, studied in Germany, President of Beijing University 1917-19, minister of education for Guomindang [Add to Longdo]

Result from Foreign Dictionaries (1 entries found)

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48 [gcide]:

  Liberal \Lib"er*al\ (l[i^]b"[~e]r*al), a. [F. lib['e]ral, L.
     liberalis, from liber free; perh. akin to libet, lubet, it
     pleases, E. lief. Cf. {Deliver}.]
     1. Free by birth; hence, befitting a freeman or gentleman;
        refined; noble; independent; free; not servile or mean;
        as, a liberal ancestry; a liberal spirit; liberal arts or
        studies. " Liberal education." --Macaulay. " A liberal
        tongue." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     2. Bestowing in a large and noble way, as a freeman;
        generous; bounteous; open-handed; as, a liberal giver. "
        Liberal of praise." --Bacon.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              Infinitely good, and of his good
              As liberal and free as infinite.      --Milton.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     3. Bestowed in a large way; hence, more than sufficient;
        abundant; bountiful; ample; profuse; as, a liberal gift; a
        liberal discharge of matter or of water.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              His wealth doth warrant a liberal dower. --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     4. Not strict or rigorous; not confined or restricted to the
        literal sense; free; as, a liberal translation of a
        classic, or a liberal construction of law or of language.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     5. Not narrow or contracted in mind; not selfish; enlarged in
        spirit; catholic.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     6. Free to excess; regardless of law or moral restraint;
        licentious. " Most like a liberal villain." --Shak.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     7. Not bound by orthodox tenets or established forms in
        political or religious philosophy; independent in opinion;
        not conservative; friendly to great freedom in the
        constitution or administration of government; having
        tendency toward democratic or republican, as distinguished
        from monarchical or aristocratic, forms; as, liberal
        thinkers; liberal Christians; the Liberal party.
        [1913 Webster]
  
              I confess I see nothing liberal in this " order of
              thoughts," as Hobbes elsewhere expresses it.
                                                    --Hazlitt.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Note: Liberal has of, sometimes with, before the thing
           bestowed, in before a word signifying action, and to
           before a person or object on which anything is
           bestowed; as, to be liberal of praise or censure;
           liberal with money; liberal in giving; liberal to the
           poor.
           [1913 Webster]
  
     {The liberal arts}. See under {Art}.
  
     {Liberal education}, education that enlarges and disciplines
        the mind and makes it master of its own powers,
        irrespective of the particular business or profession one
        may follow.
        [1913 Webster]
  
     Syn: Generous; bountiful; munificent; beneficent; ample;
          large; profuse; free.
  
     Usage: {Liberal}, {Generous}. Liberal is freeborn, and
            generous is highborn. The former is opposed to the
            ordinary feelings of a servile state, and implies
            largeness of spirit in giving, judging, acting, etc.
            The latter expresses that nobleness of soul which is
            peculiarly appropriate to those of high rank, -- a
            spirit that goes out of self, and finds its enjoyment
            in consulting the feelings and happiness of others.
            Generosity is measured by the extent of the sacrifices
            it makes; liberality, by the warmth of feeling which
            it manifests.
            [1913 Webster]

Are you satisfied with the result?


Discussions

Go to Top